JAPAN PASSES LAW AGAINST BULLYING IN SCHOOLS

Japan’s government last week enacted a bill that forbids bullying at elementary, junior high and senior high schools, in the attempt of stopping  the serious increase of bullying cases that have occurred in the country.

The law was voted in favor by the ruling coalition and other opposition parties at a plenary session in the upper house, according to the international press.

According to the new bill, bullying that leads to serious physical or mental trauma to children or makes them be absent for a long period of time is defined as a “serious case”.

Under the law, schools are required to report confirmed serious cases to the education ministry and local government. Next, the case is to be investigated by the school and education boards to obtain details.

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Investigation shows school district followed bullying protocol prior to teen’s suicide

SHEFFIELD — No wrongdoing has been found by Sheffield Middle School staff in the March 23 suicide of a 14-year-old student whose friends and aunt said he’d been bullied.

Parti Holland II

Parti Holland II

Parti Holland II hung himself in his bedroom in his Knickerbocker Road home in Sheffield Lake, according to Dr. Stephen Evans, Lorain County coroner. A few students and Jeanie Workman, Parti’s aunt, said Parti, who was 6-foot-3 and 275 pounds, was bullied because of his size and easygoing nature and because he was black. They said Parti complained in the weeks before he died that staff weren’t taking his complaints seriously because of his size.

Superintendent Will Folger said in a Monday news release that Chronicle-Telegram stories about the complaints prompted an internal investigation and one by Sheffield police. The internal investigation was done by Gary Friedt, district director of pupil services. Capt. Bill Visalden conducted the external investigation.

Visalden said Tuesday he interviewed three people at the school and called the investigation “very uneventful.” He said no criminal complaint was filed and the school district requested the investigation. Visalden wouldn’t release the investigation report, saying parts of it might need to be censored because it concerns a juvenile.

Folger called Parti’s death a “tragedy” for the Holland family and the community.

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Feds fault Albany schools in race-bullying response

The Albany school district inappropriately handled a race-bullying incident by removing the victim from the school instead of her harassers, the U.S. Department of Education has found.

The eighth-grade honors student, who is biracial, was repeatedly harassed by white classmates at Hackett Middle School in March 2012, according to a federal complaint filed by her parents. The students who bullied the girl mockingly donned Ku Klux Klan hoods, asked how much her parents had paid to adopt her and compared her skin color to theirs in Spanish class comparison exercises, the document also states.

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Though reports about bullying are increasing, the behavior itself is not

Bullying, according to new data, is down among US middle school students, despite an increase in media reports coving the subject. In fact, violence has dropped nearly 75 percent in the last two decades.

Do people ever consider the possibility that, if they’re exposed to increased reports about a social problem, it’s the reporting that has increased rather than the problem? It’s increasingly clear that this is the case with school bullying: Only news reports about it have increased, not the behavior itself. In fact, both bullying and fear of it are down among US middle school students (the grade levels that tends to experience bullying most), Education Week reports, citing new numbers from the National Center for Educational Statistics.

RECOMMENDED: Top 5 bullying myths

This is data reflecting both physical and verbal aggression. For all students in grades 6-12, “hate-related graffiti” in school classrooms, bathrooms, hallways, etc. “dropped from about 36% in 1999 to about 28% in 2011. The rate of students who reported fearing an attack or harm at school at all has also dropped dramatically, from nearly 12% in 1995 to less than 4% in 2011. For black and Hispanic students, it’s an even more encouraging shift—from more than 20% of both groups of students worried about being attacked at school to less than 5% in 2011 [the latest figures available].”

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Field trip to Orlando surfaces in local bullying case

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — A field trip taken by 8th graders to Universal Studios in Orlando is being used in legal arguments in an ongoing school incident described as bullying.

In March, Aria Jewett was allegedly injured in an attack just before school started at the Oceanway Middle School. Three teenage girls were charged, one with aggravated battery.

The mother got a restraining order to prohibit contact between the girls.

This month Melissa Thomas says while on the field trip with her daughter the girl who was charged with battery was spotted. That girl who attends another middle school was on the same field trip.

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Bullying of gay boy led parents to sue district

Faggot. Queer. Girl.

That’s what Will Baublit says classmates called him every day in the fifth grade.

They tripped him in the hallway, knocked his books out of his hands, threatened to bust his head open. At a football game, a group beat him up.

The year before, the classmates had been his friends. They’d known one another since the first grade at East Knox Middle School in rural Knox County northeast of Columbus. But in fifth grade, Will revealed that he was gay, and everything changed.

After repeated requests to school administrators to stop the bullying, the family sued the district in federal court. Though the district denied the claims, the lawsuit was settled in the family’s favor.

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Bullying Prevention at School

Bolly Prevention at school

Bullying can threaten students’ physical and emotional safety at school and can negatively impact their ability to learn. The best way to address bullying is to stop it before it starts. There are a number of things school staff can do to make schools safer and prevent bullying.

Getting Started

Assess school prevention and intervention efforts around student behavior, including substance use and violence. You may be able to build upon them or integrate bullying prevention strategies. Many programs help address the same protective and risk factors that bullying programs do.

Assess Bullying in Your School

Conduct assessments in your school to determine how often bullying occurs, where it happens, how students and adults intervene, and whether your prevention efforts are working.

Engage Parents and Youth

It is important for everyone in the community to work together to send a unified message against bullying. Launch an awareness campaign to make the objectives known to the school, parents, and community members. Establish a school safety committee or task force to plan, implement, and evaluate your school’s bullying prevention program.

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