Kobe Bryant items’ auction proceeds to benefit anti-bullying campaign

Fifty percent of the proceeds from the sale of four items of Kobe Bryant memorabilia sold at auction next month will benefit the the Bully Project, an anti-bullying campaign that seeks to create a culture of empathy.

The items are Bryant’s 2000 NBA All-Star game ring, two of his game-worn high school uniforms and his 1996 Magic Roundball Classic All-Star medallion and ribbon.

The Bully Project is an offshoot of the award-winning film “Bully,” which sparked national interest in the issue of kids tormenting each other.

“We’re delighted to have been chosen to benefit from the auction of these once-in-a-lifetime items from Kobe Bryant,” said Lee Hirsch, the director of “Bully.” “Athletes set a powerful example when they speak out against bullying and we deeply appreciate the efforts of everyone involved in this auction for helping us to amplify this message.”

Sixteen other Bryant memorabilia items will be sold by Goldin Auctions during an auction that opened Monday and runs through July 19, including a pair of 2000 NBA championship rings that Bryant had given to his parents; game-worn Lakers jerseys from the 2001-02 and 2006-07 season; a UCLA basketball signed by John Wooden and personalized to Bryant; several rare prototype sneakers and other footwear; and other autographed items.

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New bill could send bullies to jail

LANSING — A new bill could crack down on bullying by making it a crime.

House Bill 4746 was introduced this week by Rep. Dale Zorn.

Under the bill, bullying and cyber bullying would be punishable by up to 93 days in jail or a fine of up to $1,000, or both. The bill would also let the court call for a mental health evaluation of someone convicted of bullying.

“I have met with school administrators, students, parents, prosecutors and judges to create legislation that defines the assault of bullying in schools, the workplace and over the internet,” said Zorn, R-Ida.  “The behavior of bullying has become a societal problem that may need to be eradicated through professional counseling.

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Paris Jackson’s Alleged Suicide Attempt: Teen Felt “Bullied” at School

More details are slowly coming to light about Paris Jackson‘s cry for help after she was hospitalized Wednesday morning following an alleged suicide attempt.

A source exclusively tells E! News that Michael Jackson‘s 15-year-old daughter reportedly revealed recently that’s she’s been the target of bullies at school, and that the teenager has been feeling “like an outsider” as she struggled to fit in.

“She has been complaining recently about feeling bullied at school,” the insider says. “She does not have very many true friends there, and she doesn’t feel like she really fits in there.”

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Parents of bullies in Wisconsin town to be fined for their kids’ bad behavior

Police in Monona, Wisc., have thought of a unique way to tackle the problem of bullying by going straight to the parents. Adults whose children intimidate others will be ticketed and fined for failing to properly respond to the behavior.

Raising a bully in Monona, Wisc., can cost parents a pretty penny.

Police in the town are now holding parents liable for failing to address their kids’ bad behavior. Bullying fines start at $114 and repeat offenses can cost parents up to $177 every time.

RELATED: BULLY PUNISHED WITH WEARING THRIFT STORE CLOTHES

The new municipal ordinance is a response to an uptick in school shootings, teen suicides and cyber bullying. Monona Police Chief Walter Ostrenga believes that solutions to this “global” problem start at home. He’s hoping that the citations will push parents to take responsibility for their children’s actions.

But Ostrenga said tickets will be handed out only in extreme cases. Parents who are making an effort to address their child’s behavior would not be ticketed, he said. The fines are only meant for uncooperative parents — the ones who think their kids are perfect and don’t do anything wrong.

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Field trip to Orlando surfaces in local bullying case

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — A field trip taken by 8th graders to Universal Studios in Orlando is being used in legal arguments in an ongoing school incident described as bullying.

In March, Aria Jewett was allegedly injured in an attack just before school started at the Oceanway Middle School. Three teenage girls were charged, one with aggravated battery.

The mother got a restraining order to prohibit contact between the girls.

This month Melissa Thomas says while on the field trip with her daughter the girl who was charged with battery was spotted. That girl who attends another middle school was on the same field trip.

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Free program lets kids report bullying in schools with a text message

 

WASHINGTON — Students are getting a new weapon to fight back against bullies: their cell phones.

A leading education technology company on Wednesday announced it would give schools a free and confidential way for students to tell school officials via text that they are being bullied or are witnessing bullying. Blackboard’s TipTxt program could change the school climate — or reveal just how pervasive student-on-student harassment has become.

“Kids have cell phones. They have mobile devices,” said Blackboard chief executive officer Jay Bhatt, whose 9-year-old daughter is already sending digital messages to her friends. “They’re constantly interacting with their mobile devices.”

Blackboard, which provides products to more than half of the nation’s schools, will offer the service for free starting immediately. Texts sent through the confidential program will be routed to school officials, who then will determine how to investigate.

“Things always came (by) word of mouth or in the line coming back from the playground. That whisper down the lane has always occurred,” said Thomas Murray, a former principal who now is director of technology and cyber education at Quakertown Community School District in suburban Allentown, Pa. “We want students to do what’s right. This is another avenue we can tap into.”

Murray said his schools were no worse than most with bullying, but decided to be among the first to employ the Blackboard system.

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Teachers Who Bully

The problem of teachers bullying students is more common than you think. Learn how to prevent your child from becoming a victim.

In recent years, a slew of books have offered parents ample insight into the minds of young bullies.

But what if it’s the teacher who screams, threatens, or uses biting sarcasm to humiliate a child in front of the class?

Teacher bullying gets little attention, say Stuart Twemlow, MD, a psychiatrist who directs the Peaceful Schools and Communities Project at the Menninger Clinic in Houston. But his new study, published in The International Journal of Social Psychiatry, hints that the problem may be more common than people believe.

In his anonymous survey of 116 teachers at seven elementary schools, more than 70% said they believed that bullying was isolated. But 45% admitted to having bullied a student. “I was surprised at how many teachers were willing to be honest,” Twemlow says.

He defines teacher bullying as “using power to punish, manipulate, or disparage a student beyond what would be a reasonable disciplinary procedure.”

Twemlow, a former high school teacher, insists that he’s not trying to denigrate a praiseworthy — and often beleaguered — profession. “This is not being done to victimize or criticize teachers. There are a few bad apples, but the vast majority of teachers go beyond the call of duty. They’re very committed and altruistic.”

Nevertheless, bullying is a risk, he says. When Twemlow quizzed subjects about bullying, “Some teachers reported being angry at being asked the question,” he writes. “But more reflective teachers realized that bullying is a hazard of teaching.”

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